Glenda

i sing the body electric (21st century)




several years after the Heidi Game & after The Beatles broke up, i became a teenager & displaced New Yorker. we moved to Detroit. i don't remember anyone working at a factory, so maybe i picked up a general distrust of The Big Three by osmosis. but… i remember the flux capacitor as well as the Ford Pinto.

someone on tv recently mentioned how violent unions were. surprise, "the United States has had the bloodiest and most violent labor history of any industrial nation in the world". no wonder business went overseas. surprise, i didn't know General Motors also had a southern strategy & now a northern strategy. so i can't quite see the auto industry as any prototype. here's a short overview about "Automobile Workers' Strikes" from The Encyclopedia of Strikes in American History. why is there "deep-seated anti-union ideology found in American management"? here, it continues, "power is a necessary condition to gain employers' attention. If the costs of avoidance or escape by moving operations are not high, American management's first and preferred response is to resist or escape".

Walter Reuther, Stalinism, & a 1930s timeframe (Royal Stars in World War II, moving 1° every 72 years, in this case, from 1938 to 1945) make this interesting: "Reassessing the Historical UAW: Walter Reuther’s Affiliation with the Communist Party and Something of Its Meaning – a Document of Party Involvement, 1939". Robeson also fits this timeframe.

i was at the lavanderia early this morning before it got too hot & decided to start this thing, finally, with Heidi. didn't know endpoint was market Stalinism. a phrase to describe China & something k-punk talks about (alot):

  • Why the Debate? The Outcome Was Clear: Business as Usual: China: MFN [most-favored-nation] renewal was a given; 'market Stalinism' will proceed, helped by a new law to stifle social pluralism (1994).
  • China Puzzle: "Touching Stones to Cross the River" (1994) "In most important respects, the "halfway house" economy has performed extremely well since the death of Mao Zedong in 1976. At each stage of the reform, critics argued that the reforms had run out of steam and that short-term gains had been won through "easy" institutional change which would damage long-term performance. After a decade and a half of sustained growth, these arguments have worn thin. And now, this growth presents a puzzle for mainstream economic theory and policy."
  • Contradictions of 'market Stalinism', China: Signs of more openness don't mean that the party is loosening its brutal grip (2002)
  • The Dengist Period: The Triumphs and Crises of Structural Reform, 1979 to the Present (1997) "Whatever one's assessment of market Stalinism, its development was unprecedented and heretical… this strange hybrid had chalked up some impressive achievements since 1978. Market Stalinism fundamentally transformed Maoist politics, economics, and society, and lasted a good deal longer than might have been expected. It defied western liberals and modernization theorists, who argue that capitalism and markets go hand in hand with individualism and the rise of the middle class, leading in turn to democracy… Indeed, it's major problem was its tendency to produce too much growth too quickly. Finally, market Stalinism had made China a more influential force on the world stage than at any other time in its history." (The China Handbook: Questions and Answers).
  • Is China an investment opportunity or heading for crisis? (2011) "China and other emerging markets have become the destination of choice for investors seeking decent returns as western markets labour under the twin burdens of sluggish growth and record low interest rates."
  • China Investment Summit 2011 (Oct 25-28, 2011, London) "the only conference of its kind bringing together European and institutional investors, sovereign wealth funds, banks, fund managers, regulators and all key stakeholders to access China’s investment opportunities."
  • Capitalist Realism: Is There No Alternative? (2009) "The role of capitalist ideology is not to make an explicit case for something in the way that propaganda does, but to conceal the fact that the operations of capital do not depend on any sort of subjectively assumed belief. It is impossible to conceive of fascism or Stalinism without propaganda — but capitalism can proceed perfectly well, in some ways better, without anyone making a case for it" § [amazingly, Capitalism is profoundly illiterate, D/G, "Anti-Oedipus"] § "All that is solid melts into PR: Market Stalinism and bureaucratic anti-production" § "…reversal of priorities is one of the hallmarks of a system which can be characterized without hyperbole as 'market Stalinism'. What late capitalism repeats from Stalinism is just this valuing of symbols of achievement over actual achievement" § "…but what of Really Existing Capitalism? One way to understand the 'realism' of capitalist realism is in terms of the claim to have given up belief in the big Other. Postmodernism can be construed as the name for the complex of crises that the decline in the belief in the big Other has triggered, as Lyotard's famous formulation of the postmodern condition — 'incredulity towards metanarratives' — suggests. Jameson, of course, would argue that the 'incredulity towards metanarratives' is one expression of the 'cultural logic of late capitalism', a consequence of the switch into the post-Fordist mode of capital accumulation. Nick Land gives one of the most euphoric accounts of the 'postmodern meltdown of culture into the economy'. In Land's work, a cybernetically upgraded invisible hand is progressively eliminating centralized state power."

Obama gave the following speech in August, Obama Foodorama blogged it, & here's a nice something about the Weinsteins (NSFW). originally, this post fell in with Uranus & the challenges of 21st century electricity (batteries!). blah blah. previous posts (this segues from the wittich connection) were setting the stage for this, i think. however, The Chart We All Live With might be a better conclusion. China (surprise) may actually be the "prototype" (at least for the Market) i was trying to tease out of this post because (i'm guessing) it is a puzzling rule-breaker (Uranus keyword. but please check that Sabian for PRC Uranus! asteroid (1125) China, {07SG38} on 01-Oct-1949 @ 03:01:36 pm [+][+][+], Within The Depths Of The Earth New Elements Are Being Formed).

couple more hours before Jobsjobsjobs speech. looked up from the netbook earlier & Bernanke stressing if.


Remarks of the President at DNC Event [+]
August 11, 2011
[earlier, POTUS visited advanced battery manufacturing plant in Holland, MI]

Obviously this country has gone through as tough of a time as we've seen in my lifetime over the last two and a half years. But even by those standards, this last month and a half have been extraordinary. And I was just in Michigan, at a advanced battery plant. We actually have jumpstarted an entire industry here in the United States, building advanced batteries that are going to go into electric vehicles. Not only does it create jobs, manufacturing jobs that pay well, but it also is going to make a huge contribution in terms of our environment and reducing carbon emissions.

And so democracy is messy and it's tough, and our system is broken to a large degree. And that makes this election more important than 2008. 2008 put us in a position to do some extraordinary things and I can't be prouder of what we did. But in 2008, I also think everybody figured, we get through this one election and then it's all done. And then, after two and a half years, and it's been tough and there have been setbacks, there are a lot of folks who suddenly feel deflated, this is hard, I'm not sure I believe in change. (Laughter.) They've still got the Obama poster but it's all kind of frayed. (Laughter.) And Obama is grayer -- (laughter) -- he doesn’t seem as cool. (Laughter.)

But in some ways, that's a healthy thing, because what that means is in 2012, as Harvey just said, we realize this is about us. This is not about my election; it's not about one person. It's about competing visions about where we're going to take the country. Are we going to have a country that's inclusive? Are we going to have a country that gives opportunity to everybody? Are we going to have a country where everybody is sharing sacrifices but also sharing opportunities? Are we going to have a country in which what we project to the world is not just our military might, but it's also our capacity to champion human rights and women's rights and feed folks and help them become self-sufficient?

And those competing visions are going to be determined in this next election as much as they ever have before. And so I hope you guys aren’t tired because we've got a lot more work to do. And this is an ongoing project.

I'm going, on the 28th, I'm going to be at the dedication of the new King memorial, which I've flown over and it looks spectacular. And now that King has his own memorial on the Mall I think that we forget when he was alive there was nobody who was more vilified, nobody who was more controversial, nobody who was more despairing at times. There was a decade that followed the great successes of Birmingham and Selma in which he was just struggling, fighting the good fight, and scorned, and many folks angry. But what he understood, what kept him going, was that the arc of moral universe is long but it bends towards justice. But it doesn’t bend on its own. It bends because all of us are putting our hand on the arc and we are bending it in that direction. And it takes time. And it's hard work. And there are frustrations.

And if everybody here is reminded of that fact, then I'm absolutely confident that America's arc is going to be bending in the direction of justice and prosperity and opportunity.



With Chevrolet Sonic, G.M. and U.A.W. Reinvent Automaking?