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STS-128 Discovery - Flight Day #7: EVA #2 (Danny & Christer)

what they really look like


EVA #2 Begins (04:50 PM CDT), Remove the new ammonia tank from the shuttle’s payload bay and replace it with the used tank on the station. The new tank, weighing about 1,800 pounds (820 kg), is the most mass ever moved around by spacewalking astronauts. After the new tank is installed, the old one will be stowed in the shuttle for its return to Earth. With this spacewalk, ESA astronaut Fuglesang will become the first person, who is not from either an American or Russian space program, to have participated in four or more spacewalks. :Robotic Arm Operators: Ford and Stott

ISS On-Orbit Status 09/02/09 :: Conjunction Alert: Ground teams are tracking a conjunction with a debris object (Ariane V debris, SYLDA, #29274). The time of closest approach is 9/4, 11:06am EDT. A decision will be made tomorrow morning by1:00am on whether to perform a DAM (Debris Avoidance Maneuver). The DAM would be performed using the Shuttle PRCS (Primary Reaction Control System), and the maneuver duration would be approximately 3-5 hours. Retrograde and posigrade options are being discussed for the DAM. If the DAM is performed, EVA-2 may be moved to FD8 and an extra docked day will be added to the mission.

ISS On-Orbit Status 09/03/09 :: Conjunction Update: Further tracking of the debris object (Ariane V debris, SYLDA, #29274) showed a Collision Probability of zero. A DAM (Debris Avoidance Maneuver) was not required.

Astronauts Informed of Possible Conjunction Maneuver :: Wed, 02 Sep 2009 12:32:20 PM PDT :: NASA space shuttle Capcom Tony Antonelli informed Discovery commander Rick Sturckow about a possible conjunction with debris from a portion of an Ariane 5 rocket body. The conversation was preempted on NASA Television by the HTV preflight briefing and was replayed after the briefing at 2:41 p.m. EDT. Tony Antonelli: We’ve been analyzing whether we need to do Debris Avoidance Maneuver (DAM). We’re considering all the options and they’re all still on the table. The closest point of approach is at GMT 247:15:06 minutes (11:06 a.m. EDT Friday). The options that are still being considered are: we don’t need to do anything; there would be an attitude maneuver with a reboost option that we would accomplish post-EVA; the other is a deboost that will take a good chunk of the time tomorrow and would delay EVA 2 by a day. We will know more later today. We plan to do the campout tonight either way to keep our options open. NASA PAO commentary summarized that Mission Control has not yet decided if there is a need for an avoidance maneuver. Flight controllers will continue to evaluate the conjunction before making that determination. The object, with unknown dimensions, is in a highly-elliptical orbit, 32,000 by 317 kilometers. Experts in Mission Control believe the object will make its closest approach to the shuttle and station on Friday morning just after 11 a.m. EDT, at a distance of just under 11 kilometers. Since no DAM decision has been made, preparations will continue to conduct the second spacewalk on Thursday.

Debris Avoidance Options Narrowed :: Wed, 02 Sep 2009 01:42:55 PM PDT :: As experts continue to analyze a possible conjunction with debris from a portion of an Ariane 5 rocket body, NASA space shuttle CAPCOM Tony Antonelli informed Discovery and International Space Station crew members that the options have been narrowed to two: either not performing a Debris Avoidance Maneuver at all; or performing a reboost avoidance maneuver after Thursday’s second spacewalk. There no longer is any consideration being given to deboosting the shuttle and station, which would have delayed the second spacewalk by a day.

Debris Avoidance Maneuver May Not be Necessary :: Wed, 02 Sep 2009 08:08:19 PM PDT :: John McCullough, chief of the Flight Director Office, stated that it doesn’t look like the International Space Station will have to do a debris avoidance maneuver. However, the final decision will be made during the last hour of Thursday’s spacewalk. Mission Control is building a plan to conduct a reboost just in case. The piece of debris that is being tracked is approximately 19 square meters and is in an elliptical orbit. It is a fairly big piece which makes it easier to track. The closest approach (about 3 kilometers from the station) is expected at 10:06 a.m. Friday.

Crew Prepares for Second Spacewalk :: Wed, 02 Sep 2009 09:09:06 PM PDT :: Astronauts Danny Olivas and Christer Fuglesang are camping out in the Quest airlock starting at 2:54 a.m. EDT Thursday, in preparation for the second STS-128 spacewalk which begins at 5:19 p.m. John McCullough, chief of the Flight Director Office, stated that it doesn’t look like the International Space Station will have to do a debris avoidance maneuver. However, the final decision will be made during the last hour of Thursday’s spacewalk. Mission Control is building a plan to conduct a reboost just in case. The piece of debris that is being tracked is approximately 19 square meters and is in an elliptical orbit. It is a fairly big piece which makes it easier to track. The closest approach (about 3 kilometers from the station) is expected at 10:06 a.m. Friday.

Second STS-128 Spacewalk Today :: Thu, 03 Sep 2009 09:38:30 AM PDT :: Today’s wakeup song was “There is a God” by 33 Miles, played for Mission Specialist Patrick Forrester at 12:30 p.m. EDT. NASA Television will air edited footage of Discovery’s launch, taken from the Solid Rocket Booster cameras, at 1 p.m. and 2 p.m. The second spacewalk of the STS-128 mission begins at 5:19 p.m. Spacewalkers Danny Olivas and Christer Fuglesang will install a new Ammonia Tank Assembly on the International Space Station’s Port 1 truss, aided by station robotic arm operators Kevin Ford, STS-128 pilot, and Nicole Stott, Expedition 20 flight engineer.

Spacewalk Delayed :: Thu, 03 Sep 2009 02:08:43 PM PDT :: The second spacewalk of the STS-128 mission scheduled to begin at 5:19 p.m. EDT has been delayed about 30 minutes. There was an issue with Mission Specialist Danny Olivas’ chinstrap that has been resolved.

Spacewalk To Begin at 5:50 p.m. EDT :: Thu, 03 Sep 2009 02:26:13 PM PDT :: Today’s spacewalk with Danny Olivas and Christer Fuglesang now is expected to begin at approximately 5:50 p.m. EDT. The spacewalkers will install a new ammonia tank on the International Space Station truss and stow a depleted tank in Discovery’s cargo bay for return to Earth.

Second Spacewalk of STS-128 Mission Begins :: Thu, 03 Sep 2009 03:16:35 PM PDT :: At 6:12 p.m. EDT, NASA astronaut Danny Olivas and ESA astronaut Christer Fuglesang began the second of three spacewalks scheduled during the STS-128 mission. The spacewalk is scheduled to last 6.5 hours. Olivas, the STS-128 lead spacewalker, is wearing a spacesuit marked with solid red stripes. Fuglesang is wearing an all-white spacesuit.

Second of Three STS-128 Spacewalks Concludes :: Thu, 03 Sep 2009 10:14:37 PM PDT :: The second of three STS-128 spacewalks concluded Friday at 12:51 a.m. EDT. It lasted 6 hours, 39 minutes. The spacewalkers, Danny Olivas and Christer Fuglesang, completed their major objectives and some get-ahead tasks, including the installation of portable foot restraints on the station's truss.

Ammonia Tank Working Well; Transfers Ahead of Schedule :: Fri, 04 Sep 2009 07:45:05 AM PDT :: During the second STS-128 spacewalk, mission specialists Danny Olivas and Christer Fuglesang installed a new Ammonia Tank Assembly on the International Space Station. Mission Control says the new tank is working perfectly. The spacewalkers were able to perform some get-ahead tasks, but when they went to a pressurized mating adapter on node 1 to reroute cables, they did not find the cables in the expected configuration. Mission managers will decide how to approach this situation before the next spacewalk procedure review. The crews have completed more than 60 percent of the transfer work from the Leonardo multi-purpose logistics module to the station. Expedition 20 Flight Engineer Nicole Stott is preparing for the arrival of the Japanese HTV cargo craft. She will grapple it with the space station's robot arm and attach it where Leonardo is now. She is reviewing procedures and will use a trainer on the station to practice grapples with the arm.

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