northanger (northanger) wrote,
northanger
northanger

the difference between butterflies & moths



AQ 732 = DIFFERENCES BETWEEN BUTTERFLIES AND MOTHS = MIXED NATURE, PARTLY GOOD AND PARTLY EVIL (AQ-110 HALAHEL).

[+] Although butterflies and moths are very similar, they have many differences. Most butterflies fly during the day, and most moths fly during the night. The best way to identify a butterfly from a moth is to look at its antenna. A butterfly's antenna have knobs at the ends of their feelers, and the ends of the moth's antenna is either feather like or plain. Most butterflies rest with their wings held up above their bodies and most moths rest with their wings spread out flat. Typically butterflies have brightly colored wings and moths have dull colored wings. Most butterflies have slender, hairless bodies, while most moths have a fat abdomen and furry bodies. Butterflies form a chrysalis during the pupa stage of their lives. In moths, the chrysalis is normally contained inside a cocoon. Most moths have tiny hook or bristle hooking the forewings and hind wings together. Butterflies do not have this hook. Moths have existed about 100 million years longer than butterflies. So although butterflies and moths appear very much alike, there are quite a number of differences.

AQ 764 = THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN BUTTERFLIES AND MOTHS = DETERRITORIALIZATION AND STRATIFICATION = SENSITIVE DEPENDENCE ON INITIAL CONDITIONS (AQ-309 BUTTERFLY EFFECT) = THE TRANSITION BETWEEN #1 AND #2 WOULD BE AN EVENT (AQ-454 EMPIRICAL GEOPHILOSOPHY) = YE WHO COMPANY THE BIER TO THE HOUSE OF REST! (Liber Israfel).

[+] Summer, From the Journal of Henry David Thoreau :: June 2, 1855. From that cocoon of the Attacus cecropia which I found—I think it was on the 24th of May— came out this forenoon a splendid moth. I had pinned the cocoon to the sash at the upper part of my window, and quite forgotten about it. About the middle of the forenoon S— came in, and exclaimed that there was a moth in my window. My Attacus cecropia had come out and dropped down to the window-sill, where it hung on the side of a slipper, to let its wings hang down and develop themselves. At first the wings were not only not unfolded laterally, but not longitudinally, the thinner ends of the foremost ones for perhaps three fourths of an inch being very feeble, and occupying very little space. It was surprising to see the creature unfold and expand before our eyes, the wings gradually elongating, as it were, by their own gravity, and from time to time the insect assisting this operation by a slight shake. It was wonderful how it waxed and grew, revealing some new beauty every fifteen minutes, which I called S— to see, but never losing its hold on the shoe. It looked like a young emperor just donning the most splendid ermine robes, the wings every moment acquiring greater expansion, and their at first wrinkled edge becoming more tense. At first, they appeared double, one within the other. But at last it advanced so far as to spread its wings completely, but feebly, when we approached. This process occupied several hours. It continued to hand to the shoe, with its wings ordinarily closed erect behind its back, the rest of the day, and at dusk, when apparently it was waving them preparatory to its evening flight, I gave it ether, and so save it in a perfect state. As it lies, not outspread to the utmost, it is five and nine tenths inches by two and one fourth. The Azalea nudiflora [+][+][+][+][+][+] now in its prime. What splendid masses of pink, with a few glaucous green leaves sprinkled here and there,—just enough for contrast!

[+] Among the Moths and Butterflies (A Revised and Enlarged Edition of "Insect Lives; Or, Born in Prison), Julia P. Ballard :: p70. Two rough brown oval cocoons, spun (with one flat surface fastened lengthwise to a branch) by the large green caterpillar of the Attacus cecropia moth, were brought in, and lying side by side, looked as nearly alike as possible. From one of them, on March 1st, as if to show his appreciation of spring, the fine Cecropian stole out which is now in the glass before me. The other cocoon, from eagerness to see what promise it gave of a mate, was carefully cut at one end; when lo, an empty chrysalis within! Even with a microscope no place of exit was to be discerned. But his cast-off dress was in the tomb and it was evident he had, with more skill and silence than the vanishing Arab, gone off without his "tent," to enjoy the freedom he could not have had, had he been born in prison.

[+] Woolmington v. DPP [1935] AC 462 :: famous House of Lords case in English law, where the presumption of innocence was first articulated in the commonwealth [...] The House of Lords could not find any basis for the claim in Foster's Crown Law. In articulating the ruling, Viscount Sankey made his famous "Golden thread" speech: Throughout the web of the English Criminal Law one golden thread is always to be seen...

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