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spaceweather & comet mcnaught

@ spaceweather.com

SPACE STATION FLARE :: (03-Jan) On New Year's Day, "the International Space Station (ISS) made a nice pass over Devil's Tower, Wyoming," reports Tom A. Warner. "There was a brief period lasting about 10 seconds when the ISS grew significantly brighter"—it flared: {img :: Photo details: Nikon D2X, 12 mm lens, f/4, 400 ISO, 3 x 30 sec} What would make a space station flare? Probably sunlight glinting off a flat surface. Lots of flat surfaces have been added to the ISS lately. In Sept. 2006, the crew of the space shuttle Atlantis (STS-115) unfurled a new thermal radiator and added two 112-foot solar wings to the station. As the station grows, glints and flares are increasingly likely.

DENVER FIREBALL (04-Jan) :: Something from space disintegrated over Denver, Colorado, this morning around 6:20 am MST (1320 UT). Witnesses describe it as "brilliant, slow, twinkling, sparkly and full of rainbow colors." It was not a meteor. The fireball was the decaying body of a Soyuz U rocket that launched the French COROT space telescope on Dec. 27th. The re-entry caused no damage on the ground—just a beautiful display in the sky. More: news video, ground track,

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<p style="font-size:8pt;text-align:justify;"><a href="http://www.spaceweather.com/" style="color:#C00;text-decoration:none;font-weight:bold;">@ spaceweather.com</a> <br><br> <b style="color:#F00;">SPACE STATION FLARE :: (03-Jan)</b> On New Year's Day, "the International Space Station (ISS) made a nice pass over Devil's Tower, Wyoming," reports Tom A. Warner. "There was a brief period lasting about 10 seconds when the ISS grew significantly brighter"&mdash;it flared: {<a href="http://spaceweather.com/swpod2007/03jan07/Strzyzewski1_strip.jpg">img</a> :: Photo details: Nikon D2X, 12 mm lens, f/4, 400 ISO, 3 x 30 sec} What would make a space station flare? Probably sunlight glinting off a flat surface. Lots of flat surfaces have been added to the ISS lately. In Sept. 2006, the crew of the space shuttle Atlantis (<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/STS-115">STS-115</a>) unfurled a new thermal radiator and added two 112-foot solar wings to the station. As the station grows, glints and flares are increasingly likely. <br><br> <b style="color:#F00;">DENVER FIREBALL (04-Jan) ::</b> Something from space disintegrated over Denver, Colorado, this morning around 6:20 am MST (1320 UT). Witnesses describe it as "brilliant, slow, twinkling, sparkly and full of rainbow colors." It was not a meteor. The fireball was the decaying body of a Soyuz U rocket that launched the French <a href="http://smsc.cnes.fr/COROT/">COROT</a> space telescope on Dec. 27th. The re-entry caused no damage on the ground&mdash;just a beautiful display in the sky. <b>More:</b> <a href="http://www.myfoxcolorado.com/myfox/">news video</a>, <a href="http://spaceweather.com/swpod2007/04jan07/cooke.gif">ground track</a>, <a href="http://www.cloudbait.com/science/fireball20070104.html" "=""">amateur photo</a>. <br><br> <b style="color:#F00;">HOT COMET ::</b> Comet McNaught (C/2006 P1) is plunging toward the Sun. It won't hit, but at closest approach on Jan. 13th it will be only 0.17 AU away&mdash;much closer than Mercury (0.38 AU). When the hot comet emerges later this month it could be brighter than a 1st-magnitude star. Or not. No one knows what will happen. {<a href="http://spaceweather.com/swpod2007/04jan07/Dahle_strip.jpg">img</a> :: Photo details: Nikon D70, 300mm f/5.6 lens, 800 ASA, 1s exp} "This morning (Jan. 3rd) the comet was faintly visible to the naked eye before sunrise at an altitude of 4 degrees (the sun was 10 degrees below the horizon)," reports photographer Haakon Dahle of Fjellhamar, Norway. "The photo," he says, "resembles the view through binoculars." Soon, the comet will be too close to the Sun to see&mdash;unless you're SOHO. From Jan. 11th to 15th, the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory will monitor the comet-Sun encounter using its onboard <a href="http://spaceweather.com/glossary/coronagraph.html">coronagraph</a>. A date of note is Jan. 14th when Comet McNaught passes less than a degree from the planet Mercury. Join SOHO for a <a href="http://sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov/data/realtime/c3/512/">ringside seat</a>. <br><br> <b style="color:#F00;">RE-ENTRY ALERT (07-Jan) ::</b> The third stage of a Tsyklon 3 rocket is due to re-enter Earth's atmosphere tonight, Jan. 7th-8th. This is a piece of a Russian rocket launched from the Plesetsk Cosmodrome in Nov. 1990--so it has been in orbit for 16+ years! The re-entry could take place over the central or western USA. Sky watchers, be alert for fireballs. <b>Orbit details:</b> <a href="http://www.obsat.com/rentree1.html">#1</a>, <a href="http://www.reentrynews.com/1990104b.html">#2</a>. <br><br> <b style="color:#F00;">BRIGHTENING COMET ::</b> Comet McNaught (C/2006 P1) is plunging toward the Sun and brightening dramatically. Alan Dyer of Cluny, southern Alberta, Canada, took this picture at sunset on Jan. 6th: {<a href="http://spaceweather.com/comets/mcnaught/06jan07/dyer1_strip.jpg">img</a> :: Photo details: Canon 20D, 200mm lens, f/2.8, ISO100, ~1 second exposure} "The comet is bright in the evening twilight, easily visible through binoculars. I estimate its magnitude to be -1," says Dyer. To find the comet, he advises, face the sunset and look <a href="http://spaceweather.com/images2007/08jan07/skymap_north.gif">to the right of Venus</a>. The comet is also visible in the morning sky. It hugs the eastern horizon, emerging just ahead of the rising sun. Scan the horizon with binoculars to find it beaming through the glow of dawn. <b> More information:</b> [finder charts: <a href="http://spaceweather.com/images2007/05jan07/skymap_north.gif">05-Jan</a>|<a href="http://spaceweather.com/images2007/08jan07/skymap_north_m.gif">08-Jan (am)</a>|<a href="http://spaceweather.com/images2007/08jan07/skymap_north.gif">08-Jan (pm)</a>] [<a href="http://cfa-www.harvard.edu/iau/Ephemerides/Comets/2006P1.html">ephemeris</a>] [<a href="http://neo.jpl.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/db_shm?name=c/2006+P1">3D orbit</a>] [<a href="http://spaceweather.com/comets/gallery_mcnaught.htm">Photo Gallery</a>].</p> <p style="font-size:9pt;text-align:center;"> <a href="http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap070105.html" style="font-family:Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif;background-color:#990099;color:#FFF;text-decoration:none;padding-left:5px;padding-right:5px;margin-right:1px;" title="Comet McNaught Heads for the Sun ">•</a><a href="http://astroprofspage.com/archives/591" style="font-family:Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif;background-color:#FF0000;color:#FFF;text-decoration:none;padding-left:5px;padding-right:5px;margin-right:1px;" title="C/2006 P1 — another Comet McNaught">•</a><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comet" style="font-family:Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif;background-color:#FFA500;color:#FFF;text-decoration:none;padding-left:5px;padding-right:5px;margin-right:1px;" title="Wikipedia: Comet">•</a></p> <br clear="all"> <div style="border:1px #CCCCFF solid;width:515px;font-size:8pt;color:#996600;background-color:#FFFFCC;padding:12px;position:relative;margin: 0 auto;text-align:justify;">Henry Harrison in a standard work entitled Surnames of the United Kingdom (Morland Press, London: 1918), informs us that the surnames MacNaughton and McNaught are of common Celtic origin and derive from nig, Necht or Neachd, and Nechtan. The actual difference in the two forms of surname of the old clan comes to this: MacNauchtan means son of the little pledge, and McNaught means son of the pledge. The first written use of the surname in a still-existing document was made in a charter or deed given approximately in the year 1246, when Malcolm. MacNachtan was referred to as the father of Gilchrist Mac-Nachtan. The suffix -an was replaced in later times by the ending -on and -en. <br>- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -<br> South of the Firth of Tay in eastern Perthshire is the little town of Abernethy where an early church was established by the first King Nechtan, who reigned from 458 to 482. Here stands the ancient round stone tower of Abernethy, seventy-two feet high, which scholars believe was started in the reign of Kenneth MacAlpin in the latter half of the ninth century. It probably was used as a watch tower and place of refuge by the monks in times of Norse invasions. Abernethy as a place name is supposed to derive from the nearby ford of the Nethy, a small stream which flows into the river Earn. Nethy, you probably will guess, has some relation to Nechtan. <br>- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -<br> Some old maps show a point in Forfarshire marked Macbeth’s Castle and if the villain king of Shakespeare’s tragedy lived there, a MacNauchtan Thane may have known him, or fought with him, or heard the clank of his armor. So in fact all the dozens of variations fall into two categories: the Galloway name McNaught and the Anglicized equivalent McKnight. In Scotland all the variants have disappeared, and these two remain. It might be well if all of us could follow the example of our kinsmen in Galloway and reform the use of the surname by choosing either Mc-Naught or McKnight, according to preference. <br>- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -<br> The division of the McNaughts from the parent MacNauchtan clan occurred seven centuries ago, and because of the differences between Highland and Lowland environment, variances in outlook developed. There is for example the attachment of the Highland MacNauchtans to the royal house of Stewart, for which they fought loyally to the end. The Galloway McNaughts, on the other hand, were rebels against the Stewart ideas; their loyalties were for ideals embodied in the principles of freedom upheld by the Presbyterian Church. <a href="http://www.geocities.com/the_macnauchtan_saga/macnauchtan_saga_1.htm" style="color:#CCCC00;text-decoration:none;" title="THE MACNAUCHTAN SAGA: Beginning with the Word Nig">[+]</a></div> <br clear="all">
Tags: mcnaught, spaceweather
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