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Amplex® Red Reagent

The Amplex Red Reagent (PDF) (HTML) :: The key element of any Amplex Red assay is that the Amplex Red reagent is specifically oxidized by hydrogen peroxide (H202) in the presence of a peroxidase such as horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The Amplex Red reagent reacts with H202 in a 1:1 stoichiometric ratio to produce the strongly colored and brightly fluorescent reaction product resorufin. The high specificity of the Amplex Red reagent for oxidation by H202 differentiates this reagent from other substrates, which either readily auto-oxidize or react with other reactive oxygen species such as superoxide (2) ... The Amplex Red reagent has been used to detect the release of H202from activated human leukocytes, to measure the activity of monoamine oxidase in cow brain tissue, to demonstrate the extracellular production of H202produced by UV light stimulation of human keratinocytes and to measure L-glutamate in food samples.Using the Amplex Red reagent, researchers have discovered that antibodies can convert molecular oxygen to H202, which may be important in understanding a new chemical arm of the immune system, as well as the evolution of antibodies and the role they may play in human diseases. [Amplex® is a registered trademark of Invitrogen].

GON 56 = AMPLEX RED REAGENT = GEMATRIA OF NOTHING = THIS IS THE ROARING VOICE OF THUNDER {Liber Arachnid} = COULD BLOW THIS SOUL RIGHT THROUGH THE ROOF OF THE NIGHT = DAOX TIMES IN THE OL PART OF A MOMENT {Enochian Key: 10} = FIERY DARTS TO FAN THE EARTH {Enochian Key: 6} = HALL OF MAATI = JUDGMENT OF THE HIGHEST {Enochian Key: 19} = LAND OF THE WATCHERS = NYARLATHOTEP IS "THE DREAMER" = REINCARNATED = SHOGGOTHIC APOCALYPSE = SORCERER + NECROMANCER = STANDING ALONE MY SENSES REEL = THE BROTHERHOOD OF NINE = THE KEY AND GATE = THE KEY TO THE MAZE IS THE LAST EXPANSION OF THIS FORM = THE WORK OF THE WAND AND THE WORK OF THE SWORD.

amplect-, amplexi-, amplex- (Latin: embrace).

red (1) :: O.E. read, from P.Gmc. *rauthaz (cf. O.N. rauðr, Dan. rød, O.Fris. rad, M.Du. root, Ger. rot, Goth. rauþs), from PIE base *reudh- (cf. L. ruber, also dial. rufus "light red," mostly of hair; Gk. erythros; Skt. rudhira-; Avestan raoidita-; O.C.S. rudru, Pol. rumiany, Rus. rumjanyj "flushed, red," of complexions, etc.; Lith. raudas; O.Ir. ruad, Welsh rhudd, Bret. ruz "red"). The only color for which a definite common PIE root word has been found. The surname Read/Reid retains the original O.E. long vowel pronunciation. {more...}

Red is a color at the lowest frequencies of light discernible by the human eye. Red light has a wavelength range of roughly 630-760 nm ... Red catches people's attention, and is often used to indicate danger or emergency ... In religion, red represents the color of fire and so symbolizes the presence of God. It is the liturgical color for Pentecost. It is also considered the color of the Church, since red can also symbolize the blood of martyrs ... In the original Star Trek series, red uniforms are for engineering and security personnel; Star Trek: The Next Generation onwards, red uniforms are for command personnel ... The red M&Ms spokescandy has a cynical personality ... In the Star Wars universe, red is traditionally (although not always in the Expanded Universe) the color of light saber used by the Sith ... In English heraldry, red denoted ardent affection or love, while crimson (blood-color) stood for boldness, enthusiasm, or impetuosity

Reagent :: any substance used in a chemical reaction. It usually implies an element or molecule that is added in order to bring about the chemical change: Reagent(s) ==> Product(s). ++ The word "reagent" has also been used in some fantasy literature, meaning a physical substance used as a component for a magic spell. This is an extension of the term's use in chemistry. The Ultima series of computer games are an example of this use. [See also EverQuest]

reagent from re- (q.v.) + agent "substance that produces a chemical reaction" (see agent). RE- prefix meaning "back to the original place, again," also with a sense of "undoing," c.1200, from O.Fr. and directly from L. re- "again, back." Often merely intensive. AGENT - 1471, "one who acts," from L. agentem (nom. agens, gen. agentis), prp. of agere "to set in motion, drive, lead, conduct" (see act). Meaning "any natural force or substance which produces a phenomenon" is first recorded 1579. ACT - c.1384, from O.Fr. acte, from L. actus "a doing" and actum "a thing done," both from agere "to do, set in motion, drive, urge, chase, stir up," from PIE root *ag- "to drive, draw out or forth, move" (cf. Gk. agein "to lead, guide, drive, carry off," agon "assembly, contest in the games," agogos "leader;" Skt. ajati "drives," ajirah "moving, active;" O.N. aka "to drive;" M.Ir. ag "battle"). Theatrical (1520) and legislative (1458) senses of the word also were in Latin. The verb is first attested 1475; in the theatrical performance sense it is from 1594. In the act "in the process" is from 1596, originally from the 16c. sense of the act as "sexual intercourse." Act of God "uncontrollable natural force" first recorded 1882. To act out "behave anti-socially" (1974) is from psychiatric sense of "expressing one's unconscious impulses or desires."

{nierenstein :: Chemical reaction : List of organic reactions (Nierenstein reaction) : Articles in Isis (Nierenstein, M. The early history of the first chemical reagent) : Une Analogie Remarquable : Latent Developments from Gallic Acid (In the section on "Whiteness and blackness" Boyle also refers to infusion of nut galls added to iron sulphate (green vitriol) which was a well–known mixture for gall inks and even used as an invisible ink by writing with only one component and revealing the invisible image by washing with the tannic/gallic infusion, and is a reagent with a long and influential history going back to the ancient World (Nierenstein, M., "The early history of the first chemical reagent", Isis) : Nierenstein Reaction : Synthetic Tannins (Nierenstein gave the name "Tannophor" to the mother-substance of tannin, phenylbenzoate, C6H5-COO-C6H5) : Kidney Stone :: German nierenstein (nephrolith, renal calculus) : Tannin : Tannins : Tannin (Demon; Rahab, Leviathan)}.

The Talisman (1825) is a novel by Sir Walter Scott published in 1825 as the second of his Tales of the Crusaders, (the first being The Betrothed). The Talisman takes place at the end of the Third Crusade, mostly in the camp of the Crusaders in Palestine. Scheming and partisan politics, as well as the illness of King Richard the Lionheart, are placing the Crusade in danger ... The main characters are the knight Kenneth, Richard the Lionheart, Saladin, and Edith Plantagenet, a relative of Richard. Kenneth is sent on a mission to discuss a potential peace treaty with the Saracens. He meets, fights and befriends a lone Saracen emir, who eventually turns out to be Saladin in disguise ... After several betrayals and a nearly fatal mistake by Kenneth, his redemption, justice for the schemers and the peace treaty follow. (Come, then, and take your nooning in our tent, noble sirs and we'll speak of this business over some right NIERENSTEIN). See also Stephen King's The Talisman (1983).

{phenylbenzoate :: Nemat Space : David Hudson : phen·yl : phe·nol : ben·zo·ate : es·ter (Final Fantasy crystals) : photoinitiators : Two-Faced Liquid Crystals : Fries rearrangement : Covalent bond : Lewis dot diagram}.

Intermedium :: Any reagent or reactant believed to be necessary for a reaction but which does not always appear on the product.

{The Wind is the Medium of the Sky} Richard Carter Higgins (1938 - 1998) coined the term "intermedia" to describe an emerging international and interdisciplinary direction in art in his landmark essay of the same name published in the first issue of his Something Else Newsletter: "I would like to suggest that the use of intermedia is more or less universal throughout the fine arts, since continuity rather than categorization is the hallmark of our new mentality." .... Higgins found the term in an essay "Lecture III: On Spenser" by Samuel Coleridge (1812). Coleridge writes that " Narrative allegory is distinguished from mythology as reality from symbol; it is, in short, the proper intermedium between person and personification." Coleridge constructs the word "intermedium" to compare Edmund Spenser's (16th century) traditional use of medieval allegory with William Shakespeare's (17th century) superior sense of timelessness in his work. Intermedium itself is likely the compound of intermediate and medium. Archaically, medium refers to the influencing or intervening agencies of the environment. "The wind is a medium of the sky." Later, medium was used to describe a means or instrument by which something is conveyed or accomplished (words are a medium of expression). Today, of course, medium additionally is used to mean a tool or material for artistic expression or a means of mass communication, such as radio, television, journalism, or the Internet. Media, the plural form of medium, began in the 1920s to be used as a single collective noun, and that use included the introduction of the plural term medias. Intermediate as an adjective refers to a position between two points, persons, or things; the term is related to an intermediary, who acts between two people. An intermediate agent in chemistry is a temporary substance derived during a natural action or chemical process. Thus, it is not surprising that we find by 1610 the term intermedium used by chemists (and since 1611 by theaters to describe the interval between the acts of a play or musical).

as·say :: 1. Qualitative or quantitative analysis of a substance, especially of an ore or drug, to determine its components; 2. A substance to be so analyzed; 3. The result of such an analysis. 3a. An analysis or examination; 3b. Archaic. An attempt; an essay. To be shown by analysis to contain a certain proportion of usually precious metal. [Middle English, from Old French essai, assai. See essay]

es·say :: 1a. A short literary composition on a single subject, usually presenting the personal view of the author; 1b. Something resembling such a composition; 2. A testing or trial of the value or nature of a thing; 3. An initial attempt or endeavor, especially a tentative attempt. [French essai, trial, attempt, from Old French, from essayer, to attempt, from Vulgar Latin *exagiare, to weigh out, from Late Latin exagium, a weighing : Latin ex-, ex- + Latin agere, to drive. V., from Middle English assaien, from Old French assaer, assaier, variant of essayer.]

Magickal Reagents

An item that is required (an ingredient) in order to cast a specific spell or use a specific ability, and is consumed upon casting that spell or using that ability. ++ Mages require a Rune to use their Teleport and Portal spells.

Ultima

Reagents are herbs needed for the preparation of magical mixtures. Most are sold in apothecaries; a few are hard to find and require special effort to obtain. Following is a chart of the magical reagents and the general areas of proficiency they affect (in parentheses).

 • Black Pearl (Projection)--A rare version of the standard white pearl, the black pearl is a forceful reagent in the creation of kinesthetic magic, that is, projecting objects.

 • Blood Moss (Movement)--Fungal growth usually found in deep forests and warm, damp areas; especially favored as a reagent for its ability to enhance mobility.

 • Garlic (Warding)--Ubiquitous and strong-scented reagent, used effectively in warding off evil spirits.

 • Ginseng (Healing)--Ancient reagent used extensively in healing.

 • Mandrake Root (Power)--Rare, expensive, and known to glow softly in the mires in which they reside, mandrake root is said to bring great power to magic that uses it.

 • Nightshade (Poison, Illusion)--Rare, poisonous plant that appears only when the moons are in a certain conjunction. Those who learn its whereabouts and manage to be there in the dead of night when the moons are full can pick nightshade without danger and benefit from its power ability as a reagent to create illusions.

 • Spider Silk (Binding)--The magical product of the garden spider and its relatives has no peer in its ability to bind. As a reagent mixed for magic, spider silk magnifies its binding power many times over.

 • Sulphurous Ash (Energy)--Common material left by volcanic action, ash is an excellent source of energy in magical mixtures.

Spells diverge greatly in terms of difficulty and, correspondingly, in terms of danger to the caster. After years of observation and experimentation, scholars in magic have classified spells into eight circles of difficulty. Thus, Mages who can command only the simplest spells are considered to be "in the first circle." The amount of magical energy (mana) that one can gather is directly related to his or her intelligence. Mages and Druids tend to be the greatest spellcasters, followed by Bards, Rangers, and Tinkers. Paladins have a fair amount of inherent magical skill, but their chivalric code prohibits them from using destructive magic. Casting spells drains the caster's mana, limiting how many spells one can cast before resting (mana regenerates over time). A spell will drain mana in an amount proportional to the spell's circle of difficulty. For that reason, only the greatest of sorcerers can cast more than a couple of eighth circle spells without resting.

Ultima Thule

(Ultima Thule = medieval name for northern lands) Thule or Tile is in classic sources a place, usually an island, in the far north, often Scandinavia. Ultima Thule in medieval geographers may also denote any distant place located beyond the "borders of the known world" ... Nazi mystics hunted all over the world for a historical Thule, which they believed was the ancient homeland of the Aryan race ... The name of Cthulhu, the tentacle-headed monster in H.P. Lovecraft's story The Call of Cthulhu, may also be derived from Thule.

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