northanger (northanger) wrote,
northanger
northanger

biloxi man

cnn had a story about a man in biloxi running errands for his neighbors, getting ice & stuff. he's an older man & watching him as he walked behind an old shopping cart i could see his legs weren't in the best shape. but, he kept doing. i noticed that each bag of ice he dropped off was getting more filled up with melted water & less ice. he gave a bag to one of his neighbors & she said, come kiss me but don't make my husband jealous. :o). don't think fema's there yet — so i keep thinking about him. people are living in these flooded out homes that are dirty & chaotic.

don't know the man in biloxi's name so i went online & bumped into madebymark & saw a short post on a cat-5 hurrican in cuba (no fatalities) linking to The Two Americas:

Last September, a Category 5 hurricane battered the small island of Cuba with 160-mile-per-hour winds. More than 1.5 million Cubans were evacuated to higher ground ahead of the storm. Although the hurricane destroyed 20,000 houses, no one died.

What is Cuban President Fidel Castro's secret? According to Dr. Nelson Valdes, a sociology professor at the University of New Mexico, and specialist in Latin America, "the whole civil defense is embedded in the community to begin with. People know ahead of time where they are to go."

"Cuba's leaders go on TV and take charge," said Valdes. Contrast this with George W. Bush's reaction to Hurricane Katrina. The day after Katrina hit the Gulf Coast, Bush was playing golf. He waited three days to make a TV appearance and five days before visiting the disaster site. In a scathing editorial on Thursday, the New York Times said, "nothing about the president's demeanor yesterday - which seemed casual to the point of carelessness - suggested that he understood the depth of the current crisis."

"Merely sticking people in a stadium is unthinkable" in Cuba, Valdes said. "Shelters all have medical personnel, from the neighborhood. They have family doctors in Cuba, who evacuate together with the neighborhood, and already know, for example, who needs insulin."

They also evacuate animals and veterinarians, TV sets and refrigerators, "so that people aren't reluctant to leave because people might steal their stuff," Valdes observed. After Hurricane Ivan, the United Nations International Secretariat for Disaster Reduction cited Cuba as a model for hurricane preparation. ISDR director Salvano Briceno said, "The Cuban way could easily be applied to other countries with similar economic conditions and even in countries with greater resources that do not manage to protect their population as well as Cuba does."

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